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Chinese Zodiac Food Guide 2022 🐯 Year of the Tiger 🐯 Eat your Way to Health & Blessings


This Chinese Zodiac food guide is created by 
feng shui master Peng Song Hua 彭崧桦大师. According to ancient Chinese tradition, each of us is one of twelve Zodiac animals depending on our year of birth. For example, my Zodiac animal is Rat as I was born in the Year of the Rat. Traditional Chinese believe that eating the right types of food for our animal sign can enhance our health and blessings.
According to ancient Chinese philosophy, everything in the universe is made up of the Five Elements of Wuxing 五行: Earth, Fire, Metal, Water and Wood. Master Tang applied the principles of Wuxing to the Chinese Zodiac to create a food guide designed to optimise health and blessings for each of the Zodiac animals.


Wuxing of the Rat is water which nourishes wood.

Cheng_Tng

Soups and watery food are good for those born in the year of the Rat, as it is water based. 
Beneficial foods for Rat include snow fungus, lotus root, lotus seed and cordyceps flowers.


Wuxing of the Ox is earth. Gold comes from the earth, hence they are mutually promoting elements.


Foods good for the Ox are white and yellow in colour like gold. These include garlic, pumpkin, ginger and pear.


Wuxing
of Tiger is wood. When wood burns there is fire, which represents vitality and life.


Red foods like chili peppers, carrots and tomatoes represent fire. Red wine enhances the spirit of enterprise, enthusiasm and boost fortunes of Tigers.


Wuxing
of the Rabbit is wood, which burns to create fire. Fire represents vitality and prosperity. 

Flamed_Chicken

Fire imply red colour foods as well as foods that are spicy, barbequed or cooked in a hotpot. Red coloured foods reduce fatigue, ward off colds, enhance self-confidence, willpower and boost strength of the Rabbit.


The Dragon’s wuxing is earth where gold comes from.

Chili_Crab

Spicy foods are good for Dragons. Y
ellow foods which are slightly sweet nourish the spleen and digestive systems of Dragons.


Wuxing
of the Snake is fire. 

Asparagus

Suitable foods are those which are wood based in
wuxing, because wood is the source of fire. These include green vegetables like asparagus and mung beans which are rich in fibre and vitamins which help eliminate toxins from the body.


The wuxing of Horse is fire. Horses need to join forces with others to succeed. 

Cantonese_Steamed_Fish

Foods suitable for wuxing fire and wuxing water are especially good for Horses. Suggested foods include fish and seafood like sea cucumber, shrimp, kelp, oysters.


The Goat’s
wuxing is earth.

Abalone_Mushroom

Foods that strengthen the wood element include tofu, mushrooms and vegetables.


Wuxing
of the Monkey is metal. 

Char_Siew

Recommended foods for Monkey are black in colour such as black beans, black fungus, black glutinous rice as well as roasted food.


Wuxing
of the Rooster is metal. 

Fried_Carrot_Cake

Suitable foods for Rooster are white in colour like radish, potato, taro, sweet potato and ginger.


Wuxing of the Dog is earth, which is rooted in fire.

Claypot_Chicken_Rice

"Fiery" foods like those cooked in a claypot and peppery foods improve energy levels and boost fortunes of the Dog.


Wuxing of the Pig is metal.

Prawn_Mee

White colour food like scallops, fish and prawns bring blessings to the Pig.

Joyfulness Dining Restaurant has a Chinese Zodiac Five Elements Lucky Meal 👈 click

            


Written by Tony Boey on 16 Jan 2022


Image of Chinese Zodiac courtesy of Wikipedia. Image of Rat courtesy of Flickr. Image of Ox courtesy of Flickr. Image of pumpkin pancetta risotto courtesy of Flickr. Image of Tiger courtesy of Flickr. Image of Rabbit courtesy of Flickr. Image of Dragon courtesy of Flickr. Image of chili pepper chicken courtesy of Flickr. Image of Horse courtesy of Flickr. Image of Sheep courtesy of Flickr. Image of Monkey courtesy of Flickr. Image of Rooster courtesy of Flickr. Image of Pig courtesy of Flickr.

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